Esteban V. Cardemil Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Dr. Cardemil is an associate professor of psychology at Clark University and holds and adjunct professor position at Brown. He received a B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1993 and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994 and 2000, respectively. He was subsequently at Brown University, where he completed his predoctoral internship in 2000, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship.

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas

scholarly work

Cardemil, E.V., & *Sarmiento, I. (in press). Depression. In Y. Jackson (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Multicultural Psychology. New York: Sage Publications.

Addis, M.E., Cardemil, E.V., Cordova, J.V., Dowd, L.S., Hildebrandt, T., Jakupcak, M., Mansfield, A.K., Moore, T.M., & Stuart, G.L. (in press). Men's Mental and Physical Health: New Directions in ABCT. The Behavior Therapist.

Cardemil, E.V., Reivich, K.J., Seligman, M.E.P., & James, J. (in press). The prevention of depressive symptoms in inner-city middle school students: 2 year follow-up. Behaviour Research and Therapy.

Addis, M.E., Hatgis, C., Cardemil, E.V., Jacob, K., Krasnow, A.D., & Mansfield, A. (2006). Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder versus treatment as usual in a managed care setting: Two year follow-up. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Friedman, M.A., Cardemil, E.V., Uebelacker, L.A., Beevers, C.G., Chestnut, C., & Miller, I.W. (2005). The G.I.F.T. program for major depression: Integrating group, individual, and family treatment. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 15, 147-168.

Addis, M.E., & Cardemil, E.V. (2005). Psychotherapy manuals can improve outcomes. In J.C. Norcross, L.E. Beutler, & R.F. Levant (Eds.), Evidence-Based Practices in Mental Health: Debate and Dialogue on the Fundamental Questions (pp. 131-140). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Miller, I.W., Keitner, G.I., Ryan, C.E., Solomon, D.A., Cardemil, E.V., & Beevers, C.G. (2005). Treatment matching in the post-hospital care of depressed inpatients. American Journal of Psychiatry, 162, 2131-2138.

Cardemil, E.V., *Kim, S., & *Pinedo, T.M., & Miller, I.W. (2005). Preventing depression in Latina mothers: The Family Coping Skills Program. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 11, 99-112.

Keitner, G. I., & Cardemil, E.V. (2004). Psychotherapy of chronic depression. In M. Fava & J.E. Alpert (Eds.), Handbook of Chronic Depression (pp. 158-181). New York City: Marcel Dekker, Inc.

Friedman, M.A., Cardemil, E.V., Gollan, J., Uebelacker, L.A., & Miller, I.W. (2003). The GIFT program for major depression. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 10, 157-168.

Cardemil, E.V. & Battle, C. (2003). Guess who's coming to therapy? Getting comfortable with conversations about race and ethnicity in psychotherapy. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 34, 278-286.

Cardemil, E.V. (2002). Preventing paralysis in culture-based research: negotiating obstacles. Prevention & Treatment, 5, Article 14. Available on the World Wide Web: http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume5/pre0050014r.html

Cardemil, E. V., Reivich, K. J., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2002). The prevention of depressive symptoms in low-income minority middle-school students. Prevention & Treatment, 5, Article 8. Available on the World Wide Web: http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume5/pre0050008a.html

Cardemil, E.V. (2002). Depression. In V.A. Ramachandran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Human Brain (Vol. 2, pp. 101-113). San Diego: Academic Press.

Cardemil, E.V. & Barber, J. (2001). The prevention of depression: The role of the clinician in a world of research. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 32, 392-401.

research overview

Dr. Cardemil's research focuses on understanding and addressing the mental healthcare disparities that continue to disproportionately affect individuals from low-income and racial/ethnic minority backgrounds. Research projects include the development and evaluation of effective depression prevention programs for low-income minorities, questionnaire-based research that examines how sociocultural context influences depression, and mixed-methods investigations of the help-seeking process.

research statement

Dr. Cardemil's research focuses on understanding and addressing the mental healthcare disparities that continue to disproportionately affect individuals from low-income and racial/ethnic minority backgrounds. This work has been primarily in three different areas:

(1) The first area is the development and evaluation of effective depression prevention programs for low-income racial/ethnic minorities. Some of this work in the past has been with children; more recent work focuses on low-income Latino parents.

(2) The second area consists of questionnaire-based studies that examine how sociocultural context influences the experience and expression of depression and other symptoms of distress.

(3) The third line of research attempts to understand the treatment-seeking behavior of low-income Latinos.

Dr. Cardemil is currently the PI on an NIMH-funded investigation of a the help-seeking process for depression among Latino men. He is also the co-investigator on a grant funded by the William T. Grant foundation to examine the provision of structure in Caucasian and Latino families.

funded research

"Latino Men and Depression: An Exploratory Study of Help-Seeking Behavior"
NIMH (Cardemil) 2009-2011 $397,500
Role: Principal Investigator

"In Search of Structure: A Theory-Based, Mixed Method Examination of Parental Structure in Families of Adolescents"
WT Grant Foundation (Grolnick) 2008-2011 $322,616
Role: Co-Investigator
"Prevention of Depression in Latino Parents"
NIMH (Cardemil) 2002-2007 $703,304
Role: Principal Investigator

"A Longitudinal Exploration of Depressive Symptoms in Caucasian, African American, and Hispanic Children"
NARSAD (Cardemil) 2002-2004 $59,960
Role: Principal Investigator

"Preventing Depression in Latinos with Family Treatment"
NIMH (Cardemil) 2000-2002 $63,332
Role: Principal Investigator

"Prevention of Depression in low-income minority children"
NIMH (Seligman) 1997-1999 $50,000
Role: Principal Investigator