Anna Aizer Professor of Economics

Anna Aizer received her degree in Economics from UCLA in 2003 and came to Brown in 2004 after a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University's Center for Research on Child Wellbeing. She is a labor and health economist with interests in the area of child health and well-being. Her current work considers the economic determinants and consequences of domestic violence.

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas

scholarly work

Aizer, Anna and Sara McLanahan "The Impact of Child Support on Fertility, Parental Investments and Child Well-being" Journal of Human Resources vol 41, no 1, Winter 2006.

Aizer, Anna, Lleras-Muney, Adriana and Mark Stabile "Access to Care, Provider Choice and the Infant Health Gradient" American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, May 2005.

Aizer, Anna and Janet Currie "Networks or Neighborhoods? Interpreting Correlations in the Use of Publicly-Funded Maternity Care in California," Journal of Public Economics 88 (2004) 2573-2585.

Aizer, Anna "Home Alone: Supervision After School and Child Behavior" Journal of Public Economics 88 (2004).

Aizer, Anna "Low Take-up in Medicaid: Does Outreach Matter and For Whom?" American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, May 2003.

Gold, Marsha, Mittler, Jessica, Aizer, Anna and Barbara Lyons "Health Insurance Expansions through States in a Pluralistic System." Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, 26(3), June 2001.

Gold, Marsha and Anna Aizer "Growing an Industry: How Managed is TennCare's Managed Care?" Health Affairs, 19(1), Jan-Feb 2000.

Ozminkowski, Ronald, Aizer, Anna and Gerri Smith "The Value and Use of the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary Program: Early Evidence from Tennessee." Journal of Health and Social Work, 22(1), Feb 1997.

Aizer, Anna, Currie, Janet and Enrico Moretti "Does Managed Care Hurt Health? Evidence from Medicaid Mothers" forthcoming, Review of Economics and Statistics.

Aizer, Anna "Public Health Insurance, Program Take-up and Child Health" forthcoming, Review of Economics and Statistics.

research overview

Anna Aizer, assistant professor of economics and public policy, received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2002. She works in the areas of labor and health economics. She has examined the impact of public programs on child health and well-being and the economic determinants and consequences of domestic violence. The focus of her current work is the intergenererational transmission of health and income.

research statement

Anna Aizer, assistant professor of economics and public policy, received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2002. She works in the areas of labor and health economics. She has examined the impact of public programs on child health and well-being and the economic determinants and consequences of domestic violence. The focus of her current work is the intergenererational transmission of health and income.

funded research

ACTIVE

(Hogan, Dennis, Ph. D.) 2/10/2006- 2/9/2007
Office of VP for Research, Brown University – $81,654
"Exceptional Children—Exceptional Challenges: Developing an Interdisciplinary, Multinational Project for Studying Work-Family Dilemmas among Parents Raising Children with Disabilities"
This pilot project will undertake preliminary research and intensive planning for studies of the prevalence and types of child disability, the choices families make to meet conflicting family economic needs and time constraints, and the relative public and private costs of raising children with disabilities.
Role: Co-principal Investigator

PENDING

(Aizer, Anna, Ph. D.) 7/1/2006-6/30/2008
NIH – $50,000

"The Economic Determinants of Domestic Violence"
Everyday roughly 14,000 women in the United States are battered and four are killed by their intimate partners, prompting former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to label domestic violence "the single most important health issue in the U.S." Despite the prevalence and high costs of domestic violence, much remains to be understood about the economic determinants of battering. This project analyzes the impact of women's relative wages on the prevalence of battering. Existing theory is ambiguous with respect to the impact of relative income on violence. An economic model of bargaining predicts that as a woman's resources increase relative to those of her husband, violence against her should decline. Other theories, exchange theory among them, predict the opposite. It is left to empirical work to determine the nature of the relationship.

COMPLETED

SES0241861 (Currie, Janet Ph.D. and Moretti, Enrico Ph.D.)
6/1/ 2003-2/28/2005
NSF – $180,000

"Human Capital, Social Capital and Infant Health: Evidence from New Panel Data"
This project answered three outstanding questions about the relationships between human capital, social capital, and the determinants of infant health. First, how does maternal education affect infant health in a rich country such as the United States? Second, can "network effects" explain geographical/ethnic correlations in the use of publicly funded maternity care services; and third, how the implementation of Medicaid managed care in California has affected access to maternity care services.
Role: Investigator

(Aizer, Anna Ph.D.) 4/1/2003-9/30/2002
California Policy Research Center – $14,000
"The Impact of Outreach on Medical and Healthy Families Enrollment and Child Health: Lessons from California"
Of the 1.8 million uninsured children living in California, 800,000 were eligible for but not enrolled in Medicaid, the public health insurance program for poor children. This study estimated the impact of the outreach campaign California launched in mid-1988 on enrollment in Medicaid, with a particular focus on the location of community-based application assistants and the timing and placement of television advertisements. Our estimates suggest that these efforts to reduce informational and administrative barriers or costs are effective means of increasing Medicaid enrollment. Moreover, the two efforts appear to be complementary.
Role: Investigator