Beth W. Bauer Senior Lecturer Emerita in Hispanic Studies

Before joining the department in 1991, Beth Bauer served as Assistant Professor and Language Coordinator for nine years at the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University. At Brown, she has continued her involvement in the language curriculum by supervising and coordinating several Spanish courses, as well as teaching Latin American and Peninsular literature courses for undergraduates and graduates. Professor Bauer is a member of various professional organizations, including the MLA and the American Association for Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. Her research and teaching interests include 18th- and 19th-century Spanish Peninsular literature and language teaching methodology. Reflecting these interests, her publications have included Contextos: Spanish for Communication (1989) and numerous articles on Galdos, Leopoldo Alas, Juan Valera, and Emilia Pardo Bazan, among others.

Brown Affiliations

scholarly work

“Crossing Over: Gender and Empire in Fanny Calderón de la Barca’s The Attaché in Madrid.” Hispanic Review. 79.1 (Winter 2011): 43-65.

"Computer-Mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education: The Cultura Project." Article written with Lynne deBenedette, Gilberte Furstenburg, Sabine Levet, and Shoggy Waryn, forthcoming in the Journal of the American Association of University Supervisors and Coordinators.

"La vaca humana: The Wet Nurse in Galdós and Beyond." International Journal of Humanistic Studies and Literature. 3-4 (2003-04): 63-74.

Introduction to Juan Valera, Doña Luz. Transl. Robert Fedorchek. Bucknell UP, 2002.

"Something Lost: Translation, Transaction, and Travesty in Su único hijo." Revista Hispánica Moderna 48 (1995): 92-l05.

"Catholicismo, Feminism, and Anti-Semitism in Pardo Bazán's Una cristiana-La prueba." Letras Peninsulares 8 (1995): 295-309.

"Narrative Cross-Dressing: Pardo Bazán en Memorias de un solterón. Hispania 74 (1994): 23-30.

"Marta y María: Misticismo y romanticismo en Palacio Valdés." In Estudios sobre Palacio Valdés. Eds. Brian Dendle and Stephen Miller. Ottawa Hispanic Studies14. Ottawa: Dovehouse, 1993, 24-35.

"María Teresa León." in Women Writers of Spain. Eds. Linda Gould Levine, Ellen Engleson Marson, and Gloria Feinman. Westport, Ct.: Greenwood Press, 1993, 253-63.

"Confession in La Regenta: The Secular Sacrament." Bulletin of Hispanic Studies LXX (1993): 313-23.

"For Love and Money: Narrative Economies in Misericordia." Modern Language Notes 107 (1992): 235-49.

"Pepita Jiménez and La Regenta: Novels in Dialogue." Revista de Estudios Hispánicos 26 (1991): 103-21. Harper & Row, 1989, 96 pp.

"Innovación y apertura: La novela realista del siglo XIX ante el problema del desenlace." Hispanic Review 59 (1991): 187-203.

Contextos: Spanish for Communication. Barbara Freed and Beth Wietelmann Bauer.1988

"Su único hijo. La conclusión imposible." Revista de Estudios Hispánicos 20 (1986): 67-79.

"Isidora's Anagnorisis: Reading, Plot, and Identity in La desheredada." Anales Galdosianos 24 (1986): 43-52.

research overview

Beth Bauer's research and teaching interests include 18th- and 19th-century Spanish Peninsular literature, transatlantic literary relations, and language teaching methodology. Reflecting these interests, her publications have included Contextos: Spanish for Communication (1989) and numerous articles on Galdos, Leopoldo Alas, Juan Valera, and Emilia Pardo Bazan, among others. Her current research examines issues of gender and empire in the travel books of Fanny Calderón de la Barca. In order to support her teaching and research interest in U.S. Latino culture, she maintains a collaboration with A Mother's Wish, an ngo in the Dominican Republic that regularly hosts groups of students enrolled in HISP0750.

research statement

CURRENT RESEARCH/TEACHING PROJECTS AND INTERESTS
Beth Bauer's literary research analyzes fictional representation of cultural phenomena—including gender relations, secularization, and economic transitions—in 18th- and 19th- century Spain and Spanish America. Her current work on Fanny Calderón de la Barca's travel books explore the intersections between Europe and the Americas, gender, and empire in the representation of Old and New World nations.

Professor Bauer's work with language pedagogy explores social constructivist approaches to language learning, including both internet-based intercultural exchanges and community service models. Her course on Hispanic Populations in the U.S. examines Dominican culture in the United States and the Caribbean incorporates options for mentoring Dominican children in the Providence schools and for a spring break work/study trip to rural communities outside Santiago, D.R.

funded research

•1997, Brown University Swearer Center Course Development Grant ($2,000) to develop service learning course in which Spanish language learning occurs in both the classroom and the community.

•1999, Brown University Wriston Grant ($3,000) to create a new version of SP0050, Advanced Spanish Conversation.

•2002, Brown University Curricular Development Grant ($3,000) to develop an internet-based, intercultural exchange between Brown Spanish students and English students at the Universidad de las Américas in Puebla, Mexico.

•2004, Consortium for Foreign Language Teaching and Learning, Campus-based Grant ($6,000) to create a Spanish Writing Center (Pluma) at Brown.