Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics, Associate Professor of Medical Science, Associate Professor of Health Services, Policy and Practice

Overview

Neil Sarkar is the Founding Director of the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, Associate Professor of Medical Science, and Associate Professor of Health Services, Policy & Practice at Brown University. The underlying hypothesis in Dr. Sarkar’s research is that the integration of unlinked data leads to new information that can be used to inform knowledge about underpinning phenomena in biology and health. His current research includes harnessing data for supporting comparative genomic and phenomic studies of complex disease, including the development of models to predict trajectories of complex conditions, such as pregnancy and its complications. Dr. Sarkar’s work has been funded by sources such as the National Science Foundation, the Ellison Medical Foundation, the Medical Library Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Sarkar is an elected Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Medical Informatics Association. In addition to having served on the editorial boards for the leading journals in biomedical informatics (including the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, the Journal of Biomedical Informatics, and Methods of Information in Medicine [for which he was an Associate Editor]), he is is the Founding Editor-and-Chief of JAMIA Open, a Gold Open Access journal launched in 2017. He has been an author on over 100 peer-reviewed articles, which span topics from comparative genomics using phylogenetic approaches to population-level trend detection and predictive modeling in clinical and public health contexts, as well as the editor of a major text used in biomedical informatics education ( Methods in Biomedical Informatics: A Pragmatic Approach).

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas