Kay B. Warren Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. '32 Professor of International Studies, Professor of Anthropology

Kay Warren earned her PhD in Cultural Anthropology at Princeton University in 1974 and served on the senior faculties of Princeton and Harvard before coming to Brown in 2003. She is the Charles C. Tillinghast Jr. '32 Professor of International Studies and Professor of Anthropology. In 2010, Warren became the Director of the Pembroke Center -- an incubator of transnational research across the humanities and social sciences. The year before, she directed the Pembroke Center's advanced research seminar on "Markets and Bodies in Transnational Perspective" which involved faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and select undergrads from a variety of fields in the social sciences and humanities. She directed the Politics, Culture, and Identity Program at the Watson Institute for International Studies where she held a joint appointment from 2003-2009.

Warren's most recent research deals with international norms, legal systems, human trafficking, and foreign aid and focuses on Colombia, Japan, and Washington. Her earlier projects focused on Guatemala and Peru. Warren's wider research agenda has involved multi-sited ethnographic studies of counterinsurgency wars, community responses to violence and peace processes, indigenous intellectuals, the anthropology of multi-cultural democracies, and gender and politics. She also works on documentary film and media issues.

Warren's major awards include a Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, Abe Fellowship (Japan), the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Fellowship, Member of Institute for Advanced Study, John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, Wenner-Gren Fellowship, and the Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures. She was a delegate to the Global Agenda and the Global Redesign initiatives of the World Economic Forum from 2008 through 2010.

She is currently working on a book project: Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law . Her most recent edited book, Japanese Aid and the Construction of Global Development: Inescapable Solutions ," with David Leheny, was published in 2010.

Warren's other books include Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala (1998); Women of the Andes: Patriarchy and Social Change in Two Peruvian Towns , coauthored with Susan Bourque (1981); and The Symbolism of Subordination: Indian Identity in a Guatemalan Town (1979). Her other edited books include: Indigenous Movements, Self-Representation, and the State , with Jean Jackson (2002); Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Political Change , Carol Greenhouse and Beth Mertz (2002); and The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations ,(1993).

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas

scholarly work

"Repositioning without Capitulation: Discussions with June Nash on Identity, Activism, and Politics." Critique of Anthropology 25(3) (2005): 217-228.

"Critical Voices and Representational Strategies from Begoña Aretxaga's Ethnography on Northern Ireland." In, Begoña Aretxaga, with Joseba Zulaika, editor, States of Terror: Begoña Aretxaga's Essays. Reno: Center for Basque Studies, University of Nevada, 2005, 19-30.

"Indigenous Movements in Latin America, 1992-2004: Controversies, Ironies, New Directions." Annual Review of Anthropology 34, (2005):549-573. co-authored with Jean Jackson.

"Introduction: Rethinking Bi-polar Constructions of Ethnicity." Journal of Latin American Anthropology 6(1) 2002: 90-105.

"Epilogue: Toward an Anthropology of Fragments, Instabilities, and Incomplete Transitions." In, Carol Greenhouse, Beth Mertz, and Kay B. Warren, eds., Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Political Change. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002, pp. 379-392.

"Voting Against Indigenous Rights in Guatemala: Lessons from the 1999 Referendum." In, Kay B. Warren and Jean E. Jackson, eds., Indigenous Movements, Self-Representation, and the State." Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002, pp. 149-180.

"Introduction: Theory and Politics in the Study of Indigenous Movements." Co-authored with Jean Jackson. In, Kay B. Warren and Jean Jackson, eds., Indigenous Movements, Self-Representation, and the State." Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002, pp. 1-46.

Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Political Change. Co-edited with Carol Greenhouse and Beth Mertz. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002.

Indigenous Movements, Self-Representation, and the State. Co-edited with Jean Jackson. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002.

"Violence, In Anthropology." Entry A3/1/042. Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences. London: Elsevier, 2002.

"Mayan Cultural Activism in Guatemala." In, Davíd Carrasco, ed., The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

"Telling Truths: Taking David Stoll and the Rigoberta Menchú Exposé Seriously." In, Arturo Arias, ed., The Rigoberta Menchú Controversy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001, pp. 198-218.

"Indigenous Activism across Generations: An Intimate Social History of Antiracism Organizing in Guatemala." In, Dorothy Holland and Jean Lave, eds., History in Person: Enduring Struggles, Contentious Practice, Intimate Identities. Santa Fe: School of American Research, 2001, pp. 63-92.

"Mayan Self-Determination: Multicultural Models and Educational Choice in Guatemala." In, Wolfgang Danspeckgruber with Sir Arthur Watts, eds., Self-Determination and the Emerging International System: Community, Nation, and State in Global Interdependence. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. Revised edition, 2000.

"Mayan Multiculturalism and the Violence of Memories." In, Veena Das, ed., Violence and Subjectivity. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000, pp. 296-314.

"Conclusion. Dilemmas for the Anthropology of Violence: Death Squads and Wider Complicities." In, Jeff Sluka, ed., Death Squad: The Anthropology of State Terror. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999, pp. 226-247.

"Indigenous Movements as a Challenge to a Unified Social Movements Paradigm for Guatemala." In, Alvarez, Sonia, Evelina Dagnino, and Arturo Escobar, eds. Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Latin American Social Movements Revisited. Boulder: Westview, 1998, pp. 165-95.

Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998.

"Narrating Cultural Resurgence: Genre and Self-Representation for Pan-Mayan Writers." In, Deborah Reed-Donahay, ed., Auto/Ethnography: Rewriting Self and the Social." Oxford: Berg, 1997, pp. 21-45.

"Reading History as Resistance: Mayan Public Intellectuals in Guatemala." In, Edward Fischer and McKenna Brown, eds., Mayan Cultural Activism in Guatemala. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1996, 89-106.

"Language and the Politics of Self-Expression: Mayan Revitalization in Guatemala." Cultural Survival Quarterly Summer/Fall 1994: 81-86.

"Revealing Conflicts Across Cultures and Disciplines." In, Kay B. Warren, ed., The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations. Boulder, Colorado: Westview, 1993, pp. 1-24.

"Interpreting la Violencia in Guatemala: Shapes of Kaqchikel Silence and Resistance in the 1970s and 1980s." In, Kay B. Warren, ed., The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1993, pp. 25-56.

The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations. Edited volume. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1993.

"Transforming Memories and Histories: The Meanings of Ethnic Resurgence for Mayan Indians." In, Alfred Stepan, ed., Americas: New Interpretive Essays. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992, 189-219.

"Democracy without Peace: The Cultural Politics of Terror in Peru." With Susan C. Bourque. Latin American Research Review 24 (no.1), 1989.

"Technology, Gender, and Development." With Susan C. Bourque. Daedalus 116 (1987): 173-197.

"Capitalist Expansion and the Moral Order; Anthropological Perspectives." In, David Krueger and Bruce Gruelle (eds.), Christianity and Capitalism: Perspectives on Religion, Liberalism, and the Economy. Chicago: Center for the Scientific Study of Religion, 1986, pp. 161-76.

"Rural Women and Development Planning in Peru." With Susan C. Bourque. In, Naomi Black and Ann Cottrell (eds.), Women and World Change. Beverly Hills: Sage, 1981, pp. 183-97.

Women of the Andes: Patriarchy and Social Change in Two Peruvian Towns. Coauthored with Susan C. Bourque. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1981.

"Multiple Arenas for State Expansion: Class, Ethnicity, and Sex in Rural Peru." With Susan C. Bourque. Ethnic and Racial Studies 3 (1980): 264-80.

"Female Participation, Perception, and Power: Two Andean Communities." With Susan C. Bourque. In, John Booth and Mitchell Seligson (eds.), Political Participation and the Poor in Latin America, pp. 116-133. New York: Holmes and Meier, 1979.

"Comuneras and Campesinas; Sexual Subordination in the (Peruvian) Sierra." With Susan C. Bourque. Journal of Marriage and the Family 38 (1976): 781-788. Translation in Estudios Andinos 5 (1976): 77-97].

research statement

Kay Warren received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Princeton University in 1974. She served on the senior faculties of Princeton (1982-1998), where she chaired the Department of Anthropology for four years, and Harvard (1998-2003) before coming to Brown in 2003. She is the Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. '32 Professor in International Studies and Professor of Anthropology at Brown. Warren is currently directing the Pembroke Center advanced research seminar on "Markets and Bodies in Transnational Perspective." She directed the Politics, Culture, and Identity Program at the Watson Institute for International Studies, where she had a joint appointment with Anthropology, from 2003-2009.

Warren's most recent research on international norms, human trafficking, and foreign aid has focused on Colombia, Japan, and Washington. Her earlier projects focused on Guatemala and Peru. Warren's wider research agenda has involved multi-sited ethnographic studies of counterinsurgency wars, community responses to violence and peace processes, indigenous intellectuals, the anthropology of multi-cultural democracies, and gender and politics. She also works on documentary film and media issues.

Warren's major awards include a Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, Abe Fellowship (Japan), the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Fellowship, Member of Institute for Advanced Study, John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, Wenner-Gren Fellowship, and the Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures. She has been a delegate to the Global Agenda and the Global Redesign initiatives of the World Economic Forum since 2008.


PUBLICATIONS: BOOKS

Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law: Global Solutions, Local Realities (in process)

Japanese Aid and the Construction of Global Development: Inescapable Solutions, co-edited with David Leheny. London: Routledge, 2010. (available now)

Indigenous Movements, Self-Representation, and the State. Co-edited with Jean Jackson. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002.

Ethnography in Unstable Places: Everyday Life in Contexts of Dramatic Political Change. Co-edited with Carol Greenhouse and Beth Mertz. Durham: Duke University Press, 2002.

Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998

The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations. Edited volume. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1993.

Women of the Andes: Patriarchy and Social Change in Two Peruvian Towns. Coauthored with Susan C. Bourque. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1981.

The Symbolism of Subordination: Indian Identity in a Guatemalan Town. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1978. Second edition, 1989.

For her published articles, see http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Kay_Warren

funded research

Social Science Research Council and the Japan Foundation's Center for Global partnership, "Remaking Transnationalism: International Research Workshops," for meetings at Brown University, February 10-13, 2005, and Shonan, Japan, February, 17-19, 2006, with David Leheny; $30,000; support granted in 2005

Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, "Japanese ODA to Latin America: Structural Reforms, Global Issues, and Social Development from an Anthropological Perspective," $34,000, in Japan; January 2003 - June 2004, grant support awarded in 2002

Abe Fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Japan Foundation's Center for Global Partnership, "Japanese Foreign Aid in Comparative Perspective," $45,000, for research in Japan; 1998-2000, funding awarded 1998

Center for International Affairs, faculty research grants, Harvard; 1999, 2002

David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard, faculty grants; 1999, 2000

John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, "Pan-Mayan Movements and Ethnic Resurgence in Guatemala," $32,000; 1996-97, funding awarded 1996

Institute for Advanced Study Post-Doctoral Fellowship, "Activist Intellectuals and Pan-Mayan Politics in Guatemala," $33,000; 1996-97, funding awarded 1996

Wenner-Gren Foundation Fellowship, "Mayan Activism, Anti-Racism, and the Culturalist Project," $20,000, for field research in Guatemala; 1992-93, funding awarded 1992

John D. and Catherine C. MacArthur Foundation institutional grant with Henry Bienen and the Center of International Studies, Princeton, "The Violence Within: Cultural and Political Opposition in Divided Nations"; 1988-91, funding awarded 1988

Ford Foundation grant for a consortium of Women's Studies programs, with Professors Cott (Yale), Lane (Colgate), and Hedrick (Trinity); 1984-87

Mellon Foundation Fellowship to the Project on Women and Social Change, Smith College; 1981-84, funding awarded 1981

Mellon Foundation Fellowship, Mount Holyoke; 1978-79

Lassen Fellowship in Latin American Studies, Princeton; 1971-72

Fulbright-Hayes Graduate Research Fellowship; 1970-71