Peder J. Estrup Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School and Research

Newport Rogers Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Physics Emeritus
Dean of the Graduate School and Research Emeritus, Brown University

Professor and Dean Peder Estrup :
M.Sc.(Chemistry) Royal Polytechnic University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Ph.D. Physical Chemistry Yale University.
Fulbright Scholar Yale University.
Sheffield Scholar Yale University.
Postdoctoral Fellow, European Center for Nuclear Research, Switzerland
Research Staff Surface Chemistry and Physics, Bell Laboratories, New Jersey.
Group Leader, Bartol Research Foundation, Pennsylvania
Joined Brown University faculty as Professor of Physics and Professor of Chemistry.
Chair of Brown Chemistry Department 1989-96
Newport Rogers Professor of Chemistry and Physics 1992-2004
Dean of the Graduate School and Research at Brown 1996-2003
Emeritus Prof Brown University July 2004
Visiting Researcher University of California at Santa Barbara 2003-

As Professor in both Physics and Chemistry as well as Dean of the Graduate School and Research , Professor Estrup promoted and encouraged interaction and collaboration between departments and among different departments.He taught in both physics and chemistry departments and had graduate students from both departments.

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas

scholarly work

M. L. Hildner and P.J. Estrup, Structural Effects of Alkali Metal Adsorption on the Mo(100) Reconstruction, Phys. Rev. B (1997).

G. P. Lopinski and P. J. Estrup, Vibrational and electronic excitations of Na/Mo(100), Surf. Sci., 365, 149-158 (1996).

Patricia A. Thiel and Peder J. Estrup, Metal surface reconstructions, Handb. Surf. Imaging Visualization, 407-32 (1995).

John R. Thompson, Peter M. Weber and Peder J. Estrup, Pump-probe low energy electron diffraction, Proc. SPIE-Int. Soc. Opt. Eng., 2521, 113-22 (1995).

M. L. Hildner, R. S. Daley, T. E. Felter and P. J. Estrup, Atomic displacements of Mo(100) surface phases measured by ion scattering. Phys. Rev. B: Condens. Matter, 52, 9050-60 (1995).

W. Hago and P. J. Estrup, Coadsorption of alkais and hydrogen on W(100), J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A, 13, 1559-63 (1995).

G. Lopinski and P.J. Estrup, Desorption Kinetics of H/Mo(211), Surface Sci. 315, 269 (1994).

P.J. Estrup, Surface Phases of Reconstructed Tungsten(100) and Molybdenium(100), Surface. Sci. 300, 722 (1994).

research overview

Surfaces - their physical properties and chemical reactions - present us with problems that are both of fundamental scientific interest and of great technological importance. Thanks to the development of techniques capable of exploring the interface on an atomic scale, solutions to many of these problems are now within reach. Our research focuses on experimental studies of metal and semiconductor surfaces and seeks to provide realistic models for the description of the gas-solid interface, including processes such as chemisorption, film growth, and two-dimensional phase transitions.

research statement

Surfaces - their physical properties and chemical reactions - present us with problems that are both of fundamental scientific interest and of great technological importance. Thanks to the development of techniques capable of exploring the interface on an atomic scale, solutions to many of these problems are now within reach. Our research focuses on experimental studies of metal and semiconductor surfaces and seeks to provide realistic models for the description of the gas-solid interface, including processes such as chemisorption, film growth, and two-dimensional phase transitions. A chemisorbed atom or molecule experiences forces due to the adsorbent (adatom-substrate interactions) and to the other adsorbed species (adatom-adatom interactions). The bonding to the substrate is investigated by measurements of the desorption energy and by vibrational (IR and electron energy loss) spectroscopy. Adatom-adatom interactions modify the bonding; they also manifest themselves in the two-dimensional arrangement of the adatoms which can be determined by LEED and, in special cases, by x-ray diffraction (As an illustration, the photograph below shows an intriguing diffraction pattern from chlorine layer adsorbed on a tungsten(100) surface. Surprisingly complex behavior is often observed, particularly on metal surfaces. This has now been shown to be caused by ""reconstruction"": depending on the temperature and adatom density the surface metal atoms are displaced from their normal lattice positions, thereby lowering the free energy. The effects are dramatic. For example, when H2 and O2 adsorb on Mo(100) the molecules dissociate and the H and O adatoms then segregate to form ""islands"" of pure hydrogen and pure oxygen. A study of the involvement of the substrate degrees of freedom adsorption phenomena in general, is one of the important directions of the present research program. Another objective of our current research is the study of the rate at which the various surface phases form. To this end, electron probes having nano-or picosecond resolution are being developed in a collaboration with Professor Peter Weber.

funded research

See Curriculum Vitae
NSF
Department of Energy
Ford Foundation Grant
Department of Defense