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Thomas W. Doeppner Associate Professor of Computer Science (Research) [ Inactive ]

Over the past twenty years Professor Doeppner has taught a number of courses for the computer industry, teaching topics such as operating-systems internals, computer networks, distributed computing, and multithreaded programming. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton.

Brown Affiliations

scholarly work

"Using Router Stamping to Identify the Source of IP Packets", (with A. Koyfman and P. Klein), Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer and Communication Security

"ThreadMon: A Tool for Monitoring Multithreaded Program Performance", (with B. Cantrill), Proceedings of 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

"Distributed File Systems and Distributed Memory", Computing Surveys, Vol. 28, No. 1

"Variable Weight Processes with Flexible Shared Resources" (with Z. Aral, J. Bloom, I. Gertner, A. Langerman, G. Schaffer), Proceedings of Winter 1989 USENIX Association Meeting

research overview

Thomas Doeppner is interested in operating systems and everything related to them. He wrote one of the first threads packages for Unix and has worked on tools for measuring and analyzing performance of concurrent programs. More recently, he has worked with wireless devices and mobile computers, building an infrastructure for sharing information in settings such as lectures, seminars, and face-to-face meetings.
He is currently interested in the area of operating system support for security.


research statement

Thomas Doeppner is interested in operating systems and everything related to them. He wrote one of the first threads packages for Unix and has dabbled in threads and concurrency ever since. With the help of a number of top undergraduate students, he worked on tools for measuring and analyzing performance of concurrent programs, particularly on shared-memory multiprocessors. He also designed and implemented an object-oriented threads package for C++, using ideas borrowed from Sun's Spring operating system.

More recently, he worked with wireless devices and mobile computers, building an infrastructure for sharing information in settings such as lectures, seminars, and face-to-face meetings. He is currently interested in the area of operating system support for security. He is investigating means for running arbitrary programs without fear of the consequences.
In the distant past he did work in proving the correct of parallel programs and published papers in STOC, POPL, and PODC.

funded research

Gift of Tablet PCs for Electronic Student Notebook Project (Co-PI), Microsoft, $25,000, 2003

Trust and Service Negotiation (PI), Sun Microsystems, $20,000, 2003

Support for Operating Systems book and Course Development (PI), Microsoft, $30,000, 2003

Support for Mobile/Wireless-Computing Project (PI), Microsoft, $50,000, 2001

Support for Mobile/Wireless-Computing Project (PI), Microsoft, $50,000 (plus $40,000 for hardware), 2000

Multithreaded Programming and Widespread Dissemination of Information on the Web (PI), Sun Microsystems, $120,000, 1998-2000

Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $10,000, 1998-1999

Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $15,000, 1997-1998

Multithreaded Programming and Widespread Dissemination of Information on the Web (PI), Sun Microsystems, $120,000, 1997-1998

Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $50,000, 1996-1997

Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $50,000, 1994-1995

Exploiting Multiprocessors for Time-Critical 3D Graphics (Co-PI), Sun Microsystems, $180,000, 1994-1996

Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $50,000, 1993-1994

Brown's Advanced Laboratory for Instructional Computing (Co-PI), National Science Foundation, $100,000, 1992 - 1994

OSF Course Development (PI), Institute for Advanced Professional Studies, $50,000, 1992-1993

DCE Internals Course Development (PI), Open Software Foundation, $80,000, 1991-1992

High-Performance Design Environments (Co-PI), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)/Office of Naval Research, $2,580,000, 1991-1996

OSF/1 Internals Course Development (PI), Open Software Foundation, $37,000, 1990-1991

Multiparadigm Design Environments (Co-PI), National Science Foundation, $3,504,831, 1988-1993

Multiparadigm Design Environments (Co-PI), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-Office of Naval Research (ONR), $1,776,120, 1987 - 1990

Support for Concurrent Programming (PI), Encore Computer Corporation, $76,000, 1987 - 1988

Project Quattro (Co-PI), Digital Equipment Corporation, $140,000, 1986 - 1987

Project Quattro (Co-PI), Digital Equipment Corporation, $250,000 plus $750,000 equipment credit, 1985 - 1986

Graphical Programming Environments (Co-PI), IBM, $66,492, 1984 - 1985

Distributed Programming Languages - Implementation, Architecture, Methodology (Co-PI), IBM, $66,492, 1984 - 1985

Ideographics (Co-PI), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-Office of Naval Research (ONR), $1,700,000, 1983 - 1987

An Instructional Computing Environment (PI), Exxon Education Foundation, $229,143, 1983 - 1986

Research in Interactive Computer Graphics (Co-PI), Atari Computer Division, $150,000, 1982 - 1983

An Integrated Experimental Environment for Research in Computer Science (PI), National Science Foundation, $2,736,377, 1982-1987

Document Production Systems (Co-PI), IBM (Research Agreement), $295,000, 1981 - 1983

Cause: Integrated Personalized Computing Environments (Co-PI), National Science Foundation, $250,000, 1980 - 1983

A Study of Parallel Programs (PI), National Science Foundation, $38,635, 1978 - 1980

Computer Science and Computer Engineering Research Equipment (Co-PI), National Science Foundation, $198,000, 1978 - 1979