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William A. Wolovich Professor Emeritus of Engineering

Professor Wolovich's current research interests are in the areas of algebraic shape, object recognition, computer graphics, complex dynamical systems, and motion control. He has authored or co-authored over 90 technical papers and has written three textbooks, two in automatic control systems, and one in robotics. He has made significant contributions to the fields of multivariable control theory, robotics and image understanding. Professor Wolovich received the NASA Apollo Achievement Award in 1969 for his service to the nation as a member of the team that advanced the nation's capabilities in aeronautics and space. He was elected to the grade of Fellow of the IEEE in 1984 for ""Contributions to the Algebraic Theory for Multivariable Control Systems;"" he is also a Fulbright Fellow. Professor Wolovich is a past Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and the IEEE Journal on Robotics and Automation. He also served as a Member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society.

Brown Affiliations

scholarly work

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "Shape Control Using Primitive Decompositions," Proceedings of the 1999 International Conference on Shape Modeling and Applications, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan.

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "Fitting Circle Polynomials to Planar Objects," Proceedings of the First International workshop on computer vision, Pattern Recognition and Image Processing, October 23-28, Research Triangle Park, NC (1998).

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "Vision-Based System Identification and State Estimation," The Confluence of Vision and Control, Lecture Notes in Control and Information Systems 237, Springer, pp. 171-182 (1998).

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "Pose Estimation and Object Identification Using Complex Algebraic Representations," Pattern Analysis and Application, Vol. 1 (3) (1998).

(with J. P. Tarel and D. B. Cooper). "Covariant-Conics Decomposition of Quartics for 2D Object Recognition and Affine Alignment," Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, Chicago, Illinois, October 4-7 (1998).

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "Complex Representations of Algebraic Curves," Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, Chicago, Illinois, October 4-7 (1998).

W.A. Wolovich and M. Unel, "The Determination of Implicit Polynomial Canonical Curves," IEEE PAMI, October (1998).

conic line decomposition.

Example of shape modification by

research overview

Professor Wolovich's current research interests are in the areas of algebraic shape, object recognition, computer graphics, complex dynamical systems, and motion control. He has authored or co-authored over 90 technical papers and has written three textbooks, two in automatic control systems, and one in robotics. He has made significant contributions to the fields of multivariable control theory, robotics and image understanding.

research statement

Object Modeling/Measurement : Professor Wolovich and his students have developed a new, primitive, conic/line decomposition of algebraic curves which (say) outline the boundaries of free-form objects. This decomposition has been used to define canonical curves for object identification and to obtain complete sets of geometric invariants for object identification and classification. They also are using implicit polynomial models for rapid and accurate modeling and measurement of sculptured surfaces.

Geometric Design : Professor Wolovich and his students are developing new methods for blending two or more two-dimensional profile curves in order to create three-dimensional sweep surfaces that are very easy to model, measure and modify. The blending and modification algorithms they use employ their primitive conic/line decomposition of algebraic curves.

Motion Modeling and Control : Professor Wolovich and his students have created motion signature surfaces to analyze databases containing normal and abnormal motion and to develop diagnostic procedures and treatment strategies for repetitive-stress and other ergonomic injuries. Other applications include new procedures for improving the way humans and future robots interact to perform complex tasks.