Pedro Dal Bo Associate Professor of Economics

Pedro Dal Bó, Associate Professor of Economics, received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2002. He works in the areas of game theory, experimental economics, and political economy. Recent work has examined the relationship between violence, corruption, and the quality of politicians; the effect of economic shocks and policies on social conflict; the determinants of cooperation in repeated games; and the effect of democracy and moral suasion on pro-social behavior.

Brown Affiliations

Research Areas

scholarly work

"Workers, Warriors and Criminals: Social Conflict in General Equilibrium," with Ernesto Dal Bó, Journal of the European Economic Association, August 2011.

"The Evolution of Cooperation in Infinitely Repeated Games: Experimental Evidence" with Guillaume Fréchette, American Economic Review, February 2011.

"Institutions and Behavior: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Democracy" with Andrew Foster and Louis Putterman, American Economic Review, December 2010.

"Love, Hate and Murder: Commitment Devices in Violent Relationships," with Anna Aizer, Journal of Public Economics, April 2009.

"Political Dynasties," with Ernesto Dal Bó and Jason Snyder, Review of Economic Studies, January 2009.

"Tacit Collusion under Interest Rate Fluctuations," RAND Journal of Economics, Summer 2007.

"Social Norms, Cooperation and Inequality," Economic Theory, January 2007.

"Plata o Plomo?: Bribes and Punishment in a Theory of Political Influence," with Ernesto Dal Bó and Rafael Di Tella, American Political Science Review, February 2006.

"Cooperation under the Shadow of the Future: experimental evidence from infinitely repeated games," American Economic Review, December 2005.

research overview

Pedro Dal Bó studies game theory, experimental economics, and political economy.

research statement

Pedro Dal Bó works in the areas of game theory, experimental economics, and political economy. Recent work has examined the relationship between violence, corruption, and the quality of politicians; political dynasties; the effect of economic shocks and policies on social conflict; the determinants of cooperation in repeated games; and the effect of democracy and moral suasion on pro-social behavior. He is currently working on equilibrium selection in repeated games, strategy choice in repeated games, and democratic decision making.

funded research

Salomon Research Grant, Brown University, "The Power of Advice: Experimental Evidence on Correlated Equilibria," with Amy Greenwald, $10,000, 2003.

National Science Foundation, "Institutions and Behavior: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Democracy," 2007-2010, with Andrew Foster and Louis Putterman, $144.210.